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Nocturnal Screen. Oil/Oil Pastel on Linen. 4 Panels - 40cm x 170cm each. © Nobby Seymour 2004

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Tidal Screen. Encaustic on Linen. 6 Panels - each 25cm x 105cm. © Nobby Seymour 2004

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Peonie Screen. Oil/Oil Pastel on Linen. 3 Panels - each 40cm x 170cm. © Nobby Seymour 2004

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Green Belt. Oil/Oil Pastel on Linen. 4 Panels - each 40cm x 170cm. © Nobby Seymour 2004

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Shedding Bark. Oil/Oil Pastel on Linen. 3 Panels - each 65cm x 170cm. © Nobby Seymour 2004

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Burn Back - FNQ. Oil/Oil Pastel on Linen. 4 Panels - each 40cm x 170cm. © Nobby Seymour 2004

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Gutting Edge. Oil/Oil Pastel on Linen. 5 Panels - each 40cm x 170cm. © Nobby Seymour 2004

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Nobby Seymour studio, Prahran - February 2004

These screens could be hung flat on the wall, in the manner of Japanese or Chinese screens. However they are intended to be seen as folding screens, standing on the floor on their little legs. The visual penetration around and beyond the screen is important as once again it emphasises the picture plane of each panel. The planes of each panel engage with their neighbouring panel in a kinetic manner as the viewer moves past the screen  a visual pleasure denied when the screens are mounted flat on the wall.

 

Another visual pleasure provided by the three dimensions of a folding screen will be observed by the viewer approaching the screen obliquely and observing the juxtaposition of alternate panels at varying focal points. Whereas a conventional painting is designed for frontal viewing, these screens have been designed with the intention that the side view share equal importance with the frontal view.

Accommodating Change
Accommodating Change

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Entrenched
Entrenched

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Wraps it up, pretty well
Wraps it up, pretty well

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Accommodating Change
Accommodating Change

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