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SQ298. Oil Stick/Pastel on MDF Panels. 258cm x 131cm. © Nobby Seymour 2003

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Tree Fern Gully. (After the photo by Nicholas Cairé). Oil Stick/Pastel on Aircraft Ply Panels. 193cm x 160cm. © Nobby Seymour 2004

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Nocturne: Persian Gulf. Oil Stick/Pastel on Aircraft PlyPanels. 240cm x 122cm. © Nobby Seymour 2005

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Late Shower. Oil Stick/Pastel on Aircraft Ply Panels. 130cm x 130cm. © Nobby Seymour 2005

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A Matter of Fabrication. Oil Stick/Pastel on Laser Cut Aircraft Ply Panels. 200cm x 200cm. © Nobby Seymour 2005

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I’ve Got Me under my Skin. Oil Stick/Pastel on Aircraft Ply Panels. 192cm x 130cm. © 2005 Nobby Seymour

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Broken Bough. Oil Stick/Pastel on MDF Panels. 129cm x 254cm. © Nobby Seymour 2004

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Falls. Oil Stick/Pastel on Aircraft Ply Panels. 130cm x 250cm. © Nobby Seymour 2005

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A Protective Mantle. Oil Stick/Pastel on Aircraft Ply Panels. 130cm x 130cm. © Nobby Seymour 2005

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The (Remaining) Patriarchs. Oil Stick/ Pastel on Laser Cut Aircraft Ply Panels. 187cm x 150cm. © Nobby Seymour 2005

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Nocturne in the Tablelands. Oil Stick/Pastel on Aircraft Ply Panels. 315cm x 160cm. © Nobby Seymour 2005

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45downstairs, Melbourne - October 2005

While I was painting the screens for 'Unfolded Privacies' I noticed that the gap between the panels, which I referred to at the time as the neutral space, could be used to imply spatial values.

 

In the same manner that we make assumptions about time and narrative in the vertical spaces separating cells in a cartoon strip, I could imply spatial values in the space separating floating panels and leave the viewer to unconsciously make their own assumptions. I painted the first of these floating panel assemblages, SQ 298, while work on the screens was still in progress.

 

This vertical space, I was subsequently informed, is referred to in the printing trade as the gutter. Hence the title for the exhibition. Consequently the images on the panels appear to float and a visual ambiguity is created with the shadow-play on the wall beyond.

 

As our eyes are binocular and set on a horizontal plane we  tend to scan across these floating panels and read a horizontal element as a continuous image. Not so with a vertical element. For example, in order to make the vertical element of the waterfall in Falls read as a continuous element it was necessary to camouflage the horizontal breaks (drains?) with the horizontal elements of tree branches.

 

It should be noted that the three dimensional illusion of these panels is to some extent lost in translation to a two dimensional photo on a computer screen.

 

Accommodating Change
Accommodating Change

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Entrenched
Entrenched

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Wraps it up, pretty well
Wraps it up, pretty well

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Accommodating Change
Accommodating Change

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